After the first death summary

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Ben Marchand is sent with a stone from their homeland as proof of Sedeete's capture. Its occupants are forced to spend the night on the bridge, now surrounded by police and troops. Plot[ edit ] Odd Chapters The first narrator, Ben Marchand, is a teenager who is the son of a general commanding an anti-terrorism unit.

The main characters include Kate, a high school student driving the bus, Miro, one of the terrorists, and Ben, the son of a general holding a senior position in "Inner Delta"; a government anti-terrorism organisation.

After the first death presentation

It's also near Fort Delta, an aging military post that serves as the home for the "Inner Delta," a top secret anti-terrorism unit. The youngest member of the terrorist team is Miro, a year-old plucked from his native land and trained for three years, who expects to perform his first killing on this mission. Its occupants are forced to spend the night on the bridge, now surrounded by police and troops. The last odd-numbered chapter consists of apparent conversations between Ben and his father, which reveal that the boy is already dead. They are not actually in Castle but in a mental hospital where the general, broken by guilt, is now apparently a patient. The driver is instructed to drive onto an old railroad bridge while Artkin feeds the children candy laced with a drug meant to keep them quiet. Plot[ edit ] Odd Chapters The first narrator, Ben Marchand, is a teenager who is the son of a general commanding an anti-terrorism unit. The perspective switches from Ben to his father, General Mark Marchand, who left his son's room after a brief conversation and came back to find it empty. Artkin starts handing candies laced with sedatives to the children, knocking them unconscious. The frightened girl is convinced the hijackers will eventually kill her because she has seen their faces. Ben Marchand learns in the hospital as he recovers from a bullet wound sustained during the assault on the bridge that his father had used him to mislead the hijackers. Because of this, Artkin orders Miro not to kill the bus driver right away so that she can calm the children on the bus. A short time later Ben dies in what the reader believes is a suicide. Miro had recently turned sixteen, at least by the birth date assigned him in the refugee camp, and his leader Artkin promises to treat him like a man during the hijacking. Unfortunately, with the accidental drug overdose of one of the small children on the bus, Miro is cheated of the murder he is to commit.

At the same time Ben tells his story, the reader learns about the events of the bus hijacking from Miro, the youngest member of the terrorist group. Ben is briefly tortured and gives the terrorists misleading information as to the timing of a planned rescue attempt, which his father had deliberately passed to him.

They kill Artkin and Ben is wounded in the cross-fire.

After the first death quotes

Kate is more convinced than ever that she will die, but Artkin insists she must help with the children. The child's death provides Artkin with the threat he needs to use against the officials being notified of the hijacking at that very moment. Kate tries to make a run for it with an extra bus ignition key but fails. The youngest member of the terrorist team is Miro, a year-old plucked from his native land and trained for three years, who expects to perform his first killing on this mission. Ben Marchand is sent with a stone from their homeland as proof of Sedeete's capture. The military leader sends his own son, Ben, to deliver the item. Miro had recently turned sixteen, at least by the birth date assigned him in the refugee camp, and his leader Artkin promises to treat him like a man during the hijacking.

The girl dies thinking that her family would not know that she had been brave. Ben has not seen his father since the bus hijacking and worries about seeing his father with the knowledge of how he let him down that fateful day.

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After the First Death by Robert Cormier by Elwon Mathavongsy on Prezi